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what is the relationship of tsunami with seismology? - retjulian - 20 Sep 2017 13:19

Good morning, sir,

I am someone who wants to learn about seismology because I live in an area prone to sunami disaster.
my question, is there a sunami relationship with seismology?
by studying seismology, can I cope with the sunami disaster?
whether the sunami can be detected using the machine, if possible, what kind of machine can detect sunami as early as possible?

please answer. because I want to turn my environment into a safe environment.

thank you


RE: what is the relationship of tsunami with seismology? - michelle_salmon - 3 Oct 2017 08:38

Hi, Yes there is a relationship between seismology and Tsunamis. Most Tsunamis are caused by earthquake in the sea. The fault movement disturbs the water above. You can get a good explanation from the video here https://www.iris.edu/hq/inclass/animation/subduction_zone_tsunamis_generated_by_megathrust_earthquakes
We use earthquake monitoring equipment (seismometers) to monitor for earthquakes that have the potential to cause Tsunamis and DART buoys in the ocean to detect Tsunamis http://www.bom.gov.au/tsunami/about/detection_buoys.shtml


RE: what is the relationship of tsunami with seismology? - waskita - 3 Oct 2017 12:15

Basically, a tsunami is caused by sudden motion on the ocean floor. This sudden motion could be an earthquake, volcanic eruption, or an underwater landslide. UNESCO has Tsunami Information Center, and there is intergovernmental coordination group for the pacific tsunami warning and mitigation system to alert some regions for upcoming potensial tsunamis.


RE: what is the relationship of tsunami with seismology? - vandefan - 3 Oct 2017 13:55

A one-year seismic hazard model for 2017 from the US Geological Survey, forecasts lower damaging ground shaking levels in the central and eastern US compared to the previous forecast, in areas where there have been numerous earthquakes induced by wastewater disposal from industrial activities. Despite the recent drop in earthquake rates, Oklahoma and southern Kansas still face a significant risk of induced earthquake damage in 2017 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170301130521.htm